Public Service Commission releases two studies on Employment Equity designated groups (14-09)

2014-04-14

As indicated in the Public Service Commission (PSC) 2012-2013 Annual Report, the PSC has released two studies that looked at how being a member of an employment equity (EE) designated group affects both chances of promotion and perceptions of merit and fairness in staffing activities. The findings of these two studies were also presented to the Human Resources Council.

The study Members of Employment Equity Groups: Chances of Promotion looked at whether there is a significant difference between promotions of EE group members and their respective comparison groups. Comparison groups for this study were men and women who have not self-identified as members of an EE designated group. The study found the following:

  • Men who are members of visible minorities have greater chances of promotion than their comparison group, and women who are members of visible minorities have fewer chances of promotion than their comparison group;
  • Men and women with disabilities have fewer chances of promotion than their respective comparison groups;
  • Aboriginal men and women have similar chances of promotion than their respective comparison groups; and
  • Women who do not belong to another EE group have similar chances of promotion to men who do not belong to other EE groups.

The study Members of Employment Equity Groups: Perceptions of Merit and Fairness in Staffing Activities examined whether there is a significant difference between EE members' perceptions of merit and fairness and those of their respective comparison groups as measured respectively by the extent to which candidates feel:

  • they were assessed for the actual job requirements related to the position to which they applied; and
  • the staffing activity in which they participated was run in a fair manner.

Again, comparison groups for this study were men and women who have not self-identified as members of an EE designated group. The study found the following:

With regard to the perceptions of merit:

  • Aboriginal men, men with disabilities and men who are members of visible minorities have less favourable perceptions than their respective comparison groups;
  • Women who are members of visible minorities also have less favourable perceptions than their comparison group;
  • Aboriginal women and women with disabilities have similar perceptions to their respective comparison groups; and
  • Men and women who do not belong to other EE groups have similar perceptions.

With regard to the perceptions of fairness:

  • Men with disabilities and men who are members of visible minorities have less favourable perceptions than their respective comparison groups;
  • Aboriginal men have similar perceptions to their comparison group;
  • Women who are members of visible minorities have less favourable perceptions than their comparison group;
  • Aboriginal women and women with disabilities have similar perceptions to their respective comparison groups; and
  • Men who do not belong to an EE group have less favourable perceptions than women who do not belong to another EE group.

We encourage you to review the reports found on the PSC website, and share within your organization.

Should you require further information, please do not hesitate to contact Nathalie Roy, Director at 819-420-8805 or by e-mail at nathalie.roy@cfp-psc.gc.ca. General inquiries can also be sent to CFP.DSDA-Info-DSAD.PSC@cfp-psc.gc.ca.

 

Jacqueline Bogden
Vice-President
Audit and Data Services Branch

c.c.: Chiefs of Staffing