Before submitting a request for investigation

Open and timely dialogue between candidates and hiring organizations can, in some instances, address concerns about an appointment process. Here are some examples where someone may wish to contact the hiring organization (the contact person identified on the poster, the hiring manager, or the human resources branch) to obtain further information:

  • A candidate has not received any news about their candidacy;
  • A candidate has a question pertaining to their results in an appointment process; or
  • A candidate or individual may have questions or concerns about an appointment process or appointment.

There are circumstances where it may not be appropriate to discuss the matter with someone from the hiring organization. In these cases, individuals can always send a request to the Public Service Commission (PSC) to investigate a concern.

Even when an individual has already submitted a request to investigate, the concern raised can sometimes be resolved without launching a full investigation.

Facilitated resolution (once a request for an investigation has been made)

Facilitated resolution is an approach that can be used by the PSC to resolve certain matters informally without an investigation. It may be appropriate when individuals or organizations have concerns about appointment processes involving an error or omission. However, facilitated resolution may not be appropriate in some situations, such as concerns about improper conduct in an external appointment process, fraud or political influence.

After receiving a request for investigation, the PSC reviews and analyzes the information in order to determine whether the matter warrants an investigation. Sometimes, the matter may be resolved at this stage of the process if the concerned organization is willing and able to resolve it. Individuals cannot request facilitated resolution as it is up to the PSC to determine whether it is appropriate for the matter to be resolved at this stage of the process.